3 tipsThere’s no denying that being on the hunt for a new job is stressful, and even more so when you’re between positions. Most people want the process to be as smooth and fast as possible, but just how do you make that happen? There’s no secret answer to guarantee that you’ll land the interview and the job every single time, but there are a few tips that can help make your search more efficient.

 

 

 

  1. Don’t rely on one search method. Online job boards allow us to access multiple listings from the comfort of our own homes, but they eliminate the personal element from connecting with a real human at the company. Similarly, going to networking events specific to your industry is a great way to connect in person and hear about open positions, but you’ll miss any jobs from companies not present. It is imperative to cast a wide net when on the job hunt. Use online job boards to find openings that fit your skillset, even fill out that online application, then find a way to connect in person with someone at that company. A combination of different approaches will open many more doors.
  2. Make yourself an obvious fit for the position. Your resume that lists all of your varied past experience neatly fits into 1 page and your LinkedIn profile matches word for word, but does it fit the description of your desired position? The truth is, your application and resume will go through a variety of human and computer screenings before getting to the hiring manager. While your past experiences may be a great fit for the position, a computer or low-level screening employee will reject an application if they don’t see the keywords used in the job posting. Take the extra time to tailor your resume to the specific job you’re seeking. A little tweak in the verbiage of a previous responsibility can be the difference between an application that ends up in the trash and one that gets invited to interview.
  3. Be a team player. The hard work doesn’t end once you land an interview. Sure, you have tons of questions about what this position will offer you in terms of pay, continuing education, and benefits, but those aren’t the things to focus on in the initial interview. Simply put, your interviewer cares much more about what you can do for the company than what the company can do for you. Spend some time pre-interview to research the company and the role to clearly understand what their needs are and demonstrate how you can alleviate them. You want to be seen as an asset to the company and a solution to their problems in the initial interview.

 

The job hunt will never be a fun process, but it’s a necessary one. Take the steps to do it more efficiently and lessen the time between searching and starting your great new job